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HIV Prevention (PrEP)
treatment

HIV Prevention (PrEP)

PrEP (Pre-exposure prophylaxis or HIV Prevention)

 

Up to two million new HIV infections occur yearly worldwide. As there is no effective vaccine to prevent HIV transmission, prevention strategies are needed to reduce HIV acquisition

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) is when people at risk for HIV take daily medicine to lower their chances of getting HIV. Studies have shown that PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV from sex by about 99% when taken daily and at least 74% among people who inject drugs when taken daily.

 

RISK OF TRANSMISSION

According to the CDC, the risk of transmission for receptive penile-vaginal sex is 8 per 10,000 exposures. For insertive penile-vaginal sex, the risk of transmission lowers to 4 out of 10,000 exposures. For every 10,000 instances of receptive anal intercourse with a partner who has HIV, the virus is likely to be transmitted 138 times. Insertive anal intercourse poses a lower risk, with 11 transmissions per 10,000 exposures.

All forms of oral sex are considered low risk. Biting, spitting, throwing bodily fluids, and sharing sex toys all have a low risk of transmission

Learn more at https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/prep.html

 

IMPORTANCE OF ABSTINENCE

Abstinence means avoiding oral, vaginal, or anal sex and is the only 100% effective way to prevent HIV or other STDs), and pregnancy. Having fewer partners lowers your chances of having sex with someone who has HIV or another STD.

 

HIV from oral sex

In general, there is little to no risk of getting or transmitting HIV from oral sex. Theoretically, transmission of HIV is possible if an HIV-positive man ejaculates in his partner’s mouth during oral sex. However, the risk is still very low. Factors that may increase the risk of transmitting HIV through oral sex are oral ulcers, bleeding gums, genital sores, and the presence of other STDs, which may or may not be visible.
While there is little to no risk of getting HIV from oral sex, using a barrier can further reduce your risk of getting or transmitting HIV

 

Preventing HIV from anal or vaginal sex

  • Use condoms correctly every time you have sex 
  • Reduce your number of sexual partners. The more partners you have, the more likely you are to have a partner with HIV
  • Taking Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) daily to prevent HIV infection, if you are at very high risk for HIV
  • Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) means taking medicines after being potentially exposed to HIV to prevent becoming infected. 
  • Get tested for other STDs
  • Encourage an HIV-positive partner to get and stay on treatment.
  • Choose less risky sexual behaviors. Receptive anal sex is the riskiest type of sex for getting HIV

 

CANDIDATES FOR PrEP

  • Men who have sex with men (MSM) who has had anal sex without a condom or been diagnosed with an STD in the past 6 months;
  • Men who have sex with both men and women; or and transgender women
  • heterosexual man or woman who does not regularly use condoms with partners of unknown HIV status who are at very high risk of HIV infection ((eg, sex workers, injection drug users or women who have bisexual male partners).

 

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PrEP AND PEP

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) daily to prevent HIV infection, if you are at very high risk for HIV. 

Post- exposure prophylaxis (PEP) means taking medicines after being potentially exposed to HIV to prevent becoming infected. For example, if the condom breaks or exposed through an injection. PEP should be used only in emergency situations and must be started right away (within 3 days) after a recent exposure to HIV for 28 days. 

 

Can I start PrEP without an in-person doctor visit?

Yes. With telemedicine, it is possible. Start now to get a prescription sent to your pharmacy 

 

Start A Visit

Treatment

Start A Visit

HIV Prevention (PrEP)

Start A Visit

HIV Prevention (PrEP)

PrEP (Pre-exposure prophylaxis or HIV Prevention)

 

Up to two million new HIV infections occur yearly worldwide. As there is no effective vaccine to prevent HIV transmission, prevention strategies are needed to reduce HIV acquisition

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) is when people at risk for HIV take daily medicine to lower their chances of getting HIV. Studies have shown that PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV from sex by about 99% when taken daily and at least 74% among people who inject drugs when taken daily.

 

RISK OF TRANSMISSION

According to the CDC, the risk of transmission for receptive penile-vaginal sex is 8 per 10,000 exposures. For insertive penile-vaginal sex, the risk of transmission lowers to 4 out of 10,000 exposures. For every 10,000 instances of receptive anal intercourse with a partner who has HIV, the virus is likely to be transmitted 138 times. Insertive anal intercourse poses a lower risk, with 11 transmissions per 10,000 exposures.

All forms of oral sex are considered low risk. Biting, spitting, throwing bodily fluids, and sharing sex toys all have a low risk of transmission

Learn more at https://www.cdc.gov/hiv/basics/prep.html

 

IMPORTANCE OF ABSTINENCE

Abstinence means avoiding oral, vaginal, or anal sex and is the only 100% effective way to prevent HIV or other STDs), and pregnancy. Having fewer partners lowers your chances of having sex with someone who has HIV or another STD.

 

HIV from oral sex

In general, there is little to no risk of getting or transmitting HIV from oral sex. Theoretically, transmission of HIV is possible if an HIV-positive man ejaculates in his partner’s mouth during oral sex. However, the risk is still very low. Factors that may increase the risk of transmitting HIV through oral sex are oral ulcers, bleeding gums, genital sores, and the presence of other STDs, which may or may not be visible.
While there is little to no risk of getting HIV from oral sex, using a barrier can further reduce your risk of getting or transmitting HIV

 

Preventing HIV from anal or vaginal sex

  • Use condoms correctly every time you have sex 
  • Reduce your number of sexual partners. The more partners you have, the more likely you are to have a partner with HIV
  • Taking Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) daily to prevent HIV infection, if you are at very high risk for HIV
  • Post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) means taking medicines after being potentially exposed to HIV to prevent becoming infected. 
  • Get tested for other STDs
  • Encourage an HIV-positive partner to get and stay on treatment.
  • Choose less risky sexual behaviors. Receptive anal sex is the riskiest type of sex for getting HIV

 

CANDIDATES FOR PrEP

  • Men who have sex with men (MSM) who has had anal sex without a condom or been diagnosed with an STD in the past 6 months;
  • Men who have sex with both men and women; or and transgender women
  • heterosexual man or woman who does not regularly use condoms with partners of unknown HIV status who are at very high risk of HIV infection ((eg, sex workers, injection drug users or women who have bisexual male partners).

 

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN PrEP AND PEP

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) daily to prevent HIV infection, if you are at very high risk for HIV. 

Post- exposure prophylaxis (PEP) means taking medicines after being potentially exposed to HIV to prevent becoming infected. For example, if the condom breaks or exposed through an injection. PEP should be used only in emergency situations and must be started right away (within 3 days) after a recent exposure to HIV for 28 days. 

 

Can I start PrEP without an in-person doctor visit?

Yes. With telemedicine, it is possible. Start now to get a prescription sent to your pharmacy 

 

Start A Visit

Treatment

Start A Visit

HIV Prevention (PrEP)

Start A Visit

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Most STDs are transmitted through the exchange of semen, pre-ejaculate, vaginal fluids, and anal fluids. Syphilis, HPV, and HSV are passed through skin-to-skin contact.

FAQ

For certain STDs, we can start empiric treatment if you have symptoms and have been exposed to an STD.
Yes, you will be treated if your test results come back positive.
We offer expedited partner treatment once your partner consents.
STD symptoms often overlap making it difficult to differentiate the STD types by symptoms alone. The best practice is to screen for STDs if you've been exposed or are at risk of contracting an STD.

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