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PrEP (Pre-exposure Prophylaxis)

PrEP
(Pre-exposure Prophylaxis)

PrEP is the daily prophylactic medicine prescribed to HIV- negative people to lower the chances of getting HIV. When taken as prescribed, PrEP reduces the risk of getting HIV from sex by about 99% when taken daily and at least 74% among people who inject drugs when taken daily.

Who can benefit from PrEP?

Gay or bisexual male or transgender women who is at a high risk for HIV
Heterosexual people who does not regularly use condoms and at a very risk for HIV infection
People who inject drugs or share drug paraphernalia
PEP (Post-exposure Prophylaxis)

PEP
(Post-exposure Prophylaxis)

PEP is a prophylactic medicine taken after a potential exposure to HIV to prevent HIV infection. PEP should be used only in emergency situations and must be started right away (within 3 days) after a recent exposure to HIV

Who can benefit from PEP?

Had condomless intercourse with an HIV partner or unknown HIV status
Shared needles or had a needle-stick injury
Been sexually assaulted
Had HIV exposure within 3 days (72 hours)

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Is PrEP or PEP right for you?

HIV Prevention Guide

Take our quiz, and we’ll help you figure out if PrEP or PEP is right for you

Do you have any of these conditions?

Do you have multiple sex partners?

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Do you have intercourse with sex workers or women who have bisexual male partners?

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Is your partner HIV positive?

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Do you share needles or have intercourse with someone who inject needles?

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In the last 72 hours, have you been exposed to the bodily fluid of someone with HIV or unknown HIV status?

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In the last 72 hours, have you been sexually assaulted?

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We only offer PrEP or PEP to patients without HIV, Hepatitis, liver or kidney diseases.

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Your Final Result

Do you have multiple sex partners?

Do you have intercourse with sex workers or women who have bisexual male partners?

Is your partner HIV positive?

Do you share needles or have intercourse with someone who inject needles?

Do you have any of these conditions?

In the last 72 hours, have you been exposed to the bodily fluid of someone with HIV or unknown HIV status?

In the last 72 hours, have you been sexually assaulted?

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Based on your responses, you're at risk for HIV. We highly recommend PrEP

Labs required

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Based on your responses, you're at risk for HIV. We highly recommend PEP

Labs required

Consult Now Start Over

Why Us

On-demand access doctors 7 days a week for sick visits and basic medical care

Dedicated PCP to manage and keep up with your overall health

Continuity of care that allows you to build a long term relationship with the doctor

On-demand prescription refills sent to local pharmacy or delivered to your doorstep

Affordable lab, imaging and referral services with follow-up care

Online services which may mean that you don't have to take time off work or arrange childcare

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How It Works

Medical History

Step 1

Medical History

Register and answer a few health questions

Doctor's Approval

Step 2

Doctor's Approval

If appropriate, we'll approve your refill request in less than 1-2 hours

Prescription

Step 3

Prescription

Prescription pick-up at your pharmacy or home delivery

How It Works

Medical History

Medical History

Register and answer a few health questions

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Doctor's Approval

Doctor's Approval

If appropriate, we'll approve your refill request in less than 1-2 hours

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Prescription

Prescription

Prescription pick-up at your pharmacy or home delivery

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About HIV Prevention

Risk of HIV transmission

(per 10,000 exposures)

  • Receptive anal intercourse: 138
  • Insertive anal intercourse is: 11
  • Receptive penile-vaginal sex is: 8
  • Insertive penile-vaginal sex is: 4
  • Oral Intercourse: Low

Can you get HIV from oral sex?

In general, there is little to no risk of getting or transmitting HIV from oral sex. Theoretically, transmission of HIV is possible if an HIV-positive man ejaculates in his partner's mouth during oral sex. However, the risk is still very low. Factors that may increase the risk of transmitting HIV through oral sex are oral ulcers, bleeding gums, genital sores, and the presence of other STDs, which may or may not be visible. While there is little to no risk of getting HIV from oral sex, using a barrier can further reduce your risk of getting or transmitting HIV.

How to reduce the risk of HIV?

  1. Use condoms correctly every time you have sex, including oral intercourse
  2. Reduce your number of sexual partners.
  3. Taking PrEP daily if you are at risk for HIV
  4. Take PEP within 72 hours of being exposed to HIV
  5. Get tested for other STDs
  6. Encourage an HIV-positive partner to get and stay on treatment
  7. While there is little to no risk of getting HIV from oral sex

Importance Of Abstinence

Having fewer partners lowers your chances of having sex with someone who has HIV or another STD. Abstinence means avoiding oral, vaginal, or anal sex and is the only 100% effective way to prevent HIV or other STDs

  1. Choose less risky sexual behaviors.
  2. Receptive anal sex is the riskiest type of sex for getting HIV

Can I start PrEP or PEP without
an in-person doctor visit?

Yes, our process is confidential and discreet.

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FAQ

PrEP is taken before HIV exposure by people who are at risk of getting HIV to prevent. PEP means taking HIV medicines after being potentially exposed to HIV to prevent becoming infected.
No, you should not stop using condoms. PrEP doesn't give you any protection against other STDs.
You must take PrEP daily for it to work. People stop taking PrEP if your risk of getting HIV infection becomes low or your HIV partner initiated ART.
7 days for receptive anal sex, 21 days for receptive vaginal sex and injection drug use. No data are yet available for insertive anal or insertive vaginal sex.
No, PrEP is for pre-exposure. You should get PEP (post-exposure prophylaxis) instead if you’ve recently been exposed to HIV during sex or through injection drug use.